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The Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA)

Each state has laws that prohibit trade secret theft. Regardless of whether you use an NDA, you can sue under these laws to stop disclosures, and in some cases, obtain financial damages. Although it is always advisable to use an NDA, these state laws provide a second line of defense in the event trade secrets are stolen.

Forty-seven states and the District of Columbia have trade secret laws adopted from the Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA), a "model" act created by lawyers, judges and scholars in order to conform the rules of different states. The full text of the UTSA is provided here.

Courts in states that have not adopted the UTSA follow common law principles (derived from court decisions or state laws) that are similar to the general principles expressed in the UTSA.

We include the full text of the UTSA so that you can review the standards and definitions used by state courts when reviewing trade secret disputes. For example, the definitions for misappropriation and improper means in Section 1 establish a broad range of prohibited activities that allow you to pursue a trade secret thief even if you do not use an NDA. Each state may make minor variations to this act so check your state statute to verify the standards.

States That Have Adopted the UTSA

  • Alabama     Ala. Code. Secs. 8-27-1 et seq.
  • Alaska      Alaska Stat. Secs. 45.50.910 et seq.  
  • Arizona     Arizona R.S. Secs. 44-401 et seq.      
  • Arkansas    Ark. Stat. Ann. Secs. 4-75-601 et seq.      
  • California  Cal. Civ. Code Secs.3426 et seq.     
  • Colorado    Col. Rev. Stat Secs. 7-74-101   
  • Connecticut Conn. Genl. Stat. Secs.35-50 et seq.
  • Delaware    Del. Code Ann. Title 6 Secs. 2001 et seq.   
  • District of Columbia    D.C. Code Ann. Secs. 48-501 et seq.   
  • Florida     Fla. Stat Ann. Secs. 688.001 et seq.  
  • Georgia     Ga. C.A. Secs.10-1-760 et seq.  
  • Hawaii      Haw. Rev. Stat. Secs. 482B-1 et seq.  
  • Idaho Idaho Code Secs. 48-801 et seq.
  • Illinois    Ill. Ann. Stat. ch. 140 Secs. 351-59  
  • Indiana     Ind. Code. Ann. Secs.24-3-1    
  • Iowa 1990 90 Acts, ch 1201 Section 550.1 et.seq.    
  • Kansas      Kan. Stat. Ann. Secs. 60-3320 et seq.    
  • Kentucky    Ky. R.S. Secs. 365.880 et seq.   
  • Louisiana   La. Rev. Stat. Ann. Secs. 51:1431 et seq.   
  • Maine M.R.S.A. Title 10Secs. 1541 et seq.  
  • Maryland    Md. Com. L. Code Secs. 11-1201 et seq.      
  • Michigan    M.C.L.A. Secs. 445.1901 to 445.1910   
  • Minnesota   Minn. Stat Ann.Secs. 325C.01 et seq.
  • Mississippi M.C.A.Secs. 75-26-1 et seq.     
  • Missouri    Mo. Stat. Secs. 417.450 to 417.467    
  • Montana     Mont. Code Ann. Secs.30-14-401 et seq.     
  • Nebraska    Neb. Rev. Stat. Secs. 87-501 et seq.  
  • Nevada      Nev. Rev. Stat. Secs. 600A.010 et seq.      
  • New Hampshire     N.H. R.S.A. Secs. 350-B:1 et seq.
  • New Jersey     N.J. S-2456/A921 (enacted 2012)
  • New Mexico  N.M. Stat. Ann.Secs.57-3A-1 et seq.  
  • North Carolina    N.C. Gen. Stat. Secs. 66-152 et seq.  
  • North Dakota      N.D. Cent. Code Secs. 47-25.1-01 et seq.    
  • Ohio  R.C.Secs. 1333.61 et seq.
  • Oklahoma    Okl. Genl. Laws Secs. 6-41-1    
  • Oregon      Or. Rev. Stat. Secs. 646.461 et seq.  
  • Pennsylvania      12 Pa. Cons. Stats Secs. 5392 et. seq..  
  • Rhode Island      R.I. Gen. Laws Secs. 6-41-1 et seq.   
  • South Carolina    S.C. C.A. Secs.39-8-1 et seq.   
  • South Dakota      S.D. Cod. Laws Secs.37-29-1 et seq.  
  • Tennessee     Tenn. Code Secs. 47-25-1701 et al.  
  • Utah  Utah Code Ann. Secs. 13-24-1 et seq.  
  • Vermont     Ch. 143 Section 4601 et. seq.
  • Virginia    Va. Code. Ann. Secs. 59.1-336 et seq.
  • Washington Wash. Rev. Code. Ann. Secs. 19.108.010 et seq.    
  • West Virginia     W. VA. Code. Secs.47-22-1 et seq.  
  • Wisconsin   Wis. Stat. Ann. Secs.134.90     
  • Wyoming   Wyo. Statues Secs. 40-24-101 et. al     

States that have not adopted the UTSA. The following states protect trade secrets under unique state statutes or under the common law: Massachusetts, New York, and Texas.

Uniform Trade Secrets Act

1. Definitions

As used in this Act, unless the context requires otherwise:

(1) "Improper means" includes theft, bribery, misrepresentation, breach or inducement of a breach of duty to maintain secrecy, or espionage through electronic or other means.

(2) "Misappropriation " means: (i) acquisition of a trade secret of another by a person who knows or has reason to know that the trade secret was acquired by improper means; or (ii) disclosure or use of a trade secret of another without express or implied consent by a person who (A) used improper means to acquire knowledge of the trade secret; or (B) at the time of disclosure or use knew or had reason to know that his knowledge of the trade secret was (I) derived from or through a person who has utilized improper means to acquire it; (II) acquired under circumstances giving rise to a duty to maintain its secrecy or limit its use; or (III) derived from or through a person who owed a duty to the person seeking relief to maintain its secrecy or limit its use; or (C) before a material change of his position, knew or had reason to know that it was a trade secret and that knowledge of it had been acquired by accident or mistake.

(3) "Person" means a natural person, corporation, business trust, estate, trust, partnership, association, joint venture, government, governmental subdivision or agency, or any other legal or commercial entity.

(4) "Trade secret" means information, including a formula, pattern, compilation, program device, method, technique, or process, that: (i) derives independent economic value, actual or potential, from not being generally known to, and not being readily ascertainable by proper means by, other persons who can obtain economic value from its disclosure or use, and (ii) is the subject of efforts that are reasonable under the circumstances to maintain its secrecy.

2. Injunctive Relief

(a) Actual or threatened misappropriation may be enjoined. Upon application to the court an injunction shall be terminated when the trade secret has ceased to exist, but the injunction may be continued for an additional reasonable period of time in order to eliminate commercial advantage that otherwise would be derived from the misappropriation.

(b) In exceptional circumstances, an injunction may condition future use upon payment of a reasonable royalty for no longer than the period of time for which use could have been prohibited. Exceptional circumstances include, but are not limited to, a material and prejudicial change of position prior to acquiring knowledge or reason to know of misappropriation that renders a prohibitive injunction inequitable.

(c) In appropriate circumstances, affirmative acts to protect a trade secret may be compelled by court order.

3. Damages

(a) Except to the extent that a material and prejudicial change of position prior to acquiring knowledge or reason to know of misappropriation renders a monetary recovery inequitable, a complainant is entitled to recover damages for misappropriation. Damages can include both the actual loss caused by misappropriation and the unjust enrichment caused by misappropriation that is not taken into account in computing actual loss. In lieu of damages measured by any other methods, the damages caused by misappropriation may be measured by imposition of liability for a reasonable royalty for a misappropriator's unauthorized disclosure or use of a trade secret.

(b) If willful and malicious misappropriation exists, the court may award exemplary damages in the amount not exceeding twice any award made under subsection (a).

4. Attorney's Fees

If (i) a claim of misappropriation is made in bad faith, (ii) a motion to terminate an injunction is made or resisted in bad faith, or (iii) willful and malicious misappropriation exists, the court may award reasonable attorney's fees to the prevailing party.

5. Preservation of Secrecy

In action under this Act, a court shall preserve the secrecy of an alleged trade secret by reasonable means, which may include granting protective orders in connection with discovery proceedings, holding in-camera hearings, sealing the records of the action, and ordering any person involved in the litigation not to disclose an alleged trade secret without prior court approval.

6. Statute of Limitations

An action for misappropriation must be brought within 3 years after the misappropriation is discovered or by the exercise of reasonable diligence should have been discovered. For the purposes of this section, a continuing misappropriation constitutes a single claim.

7. Effect on Other Law

(a) Except as provided in subsection (b), this [Act] displaces conflicting tort, restitutionary, and other law of this State providing civil remedies for misappropriation of a trade secret.

(b) This [Act] does not affect: (1) contractual remedies, whether or not based upon misappropriation of a trade secret; or (2) other civil remedies that are not based upon misappropriation of a trade secret; or (3) criminal remedies, whether or not based upon misappropriation of a trade secret.

8. Uniformity of Application and               Construction

This act shall be applied and construed to effectuate its general purpose to make uniform the law with respect to the subject of this Act among states enacting it.

9. Short Title

This Act may be cited as the Uniform Trade Secrets Act.

10. Severability

If any provision of this Act or its application to any person or circumstances is held invalid, the invalidity does not affect other provisions or applications of the Act which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and to this end the provisions of this Act are severable.

11. Time of Taking Effect

This [Act] takes effect on , and does not apply to misappropriation occurring prior to the effective date. With respect to a continuing misappropriation that began prior to the effective date, the [Act] also does not apply to the continuing misappropriation that occurs after the effective date.

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